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Before surge in cases, Gordon had hoped to eliminate coronavirus restrictions
Before surge in cases, Gordon had hoped to eliminate coronavirus restrictions
Gov. Mark Gordon said he was hopeful “up until about a week ago” that the state could soon eliminate its restrictions put in place to limit the virus’ spread. Instead, because of a surge in new cases, the restrictions were extended.
Gov. Mark Gordon said he was hopeful “up until about a week ago” that the state could soon eliminate its restrictions put in place to limit the virus’ spread. Instead, because of a surge in new cases, the restrictions were extended.

Speaking Wednesday at a news conference, Gordon said Wyoming continues to experience a surge in cases that began in June. He stressed the need to follow public health guidelines to avoid the need to tighten restrictions again.

“We were really feeling like we were on such a great trajectory that we really were moving to being almost completely unrestricted,” he said. “And because we’ve seen this spike, we’ve had to hit pause and extend these orders for another 15 days.”

The state on Monday extended its public health orders until July 15. The orders, which were set to expire Tuesday, are the first to be extended without being loosened in six weeks.

Gordon noted that governors in other states, including Florida and Texas, have closed some businesses again because of spikes there that have begun to fill hospital intensive care units to near capacity. He noted that was a possibility in Wyoming if the situation worsened.

“This is something we don’t want to do,” he said.

As he has in the past, Gordon framed the need to follow public health guidelines in economic terms. If people wear face masks, wash hands and social distance, the state’s economy will continue to recover, he argued.

“I think people thought, ‘No big deal,’” Gordon said. “And you know we can just do what we want to. And I think that carelessness and cavalier attitude has been incredibly unfortunate.

“And so, you know, I come back to saying, if you want the economy to keep going, if you want to make sure that we stay open, if you want to see us move forward to where we were hoping to be, you know, people will mask up,” he said. “People will adhere to these things. People won’t be so cavalier.”

Many people in the state continue to forgo wearing masks in public. Gordon compared such reluctance to “a game of chicken, to a degree.” At indoor businesses in Casper, for example, there are fewer people wearing masks than those going without them.

“And that often doesn’t end well,” he said. “So it’s best to use good judgment. We’re really counting on people to do that.”
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Before surge in cases, Gordon had hoped to eliminate coronavirus restrictions
Before surge in cases, Gordon had hoped to eliminate coronavirus restrictions
Gov. Mark Gordon said he was hopeful “up until about a week ago” that the state could soon eliminate its restrictions put in place to limit the virus’ spread. Instead, because of a surge in new cases, the restrictions were extended.
Gov. Mark Gordon said he was hopeful “up until about a week ago” that the state could soon eliminate its restrictions put in place to limit the virus’ spread. Instead, because of a surge in new cases, the restrictions were extended.

Speaking Wednesday at a news conference, Gordon said Wyoming continues to experience a surge in cases that began in June. He stressed the need to follow public health guidelines to avoid the need to tighten restrictions again.

“We were really feeling like we were on such a great trajectory that we really were moving to being almost completely unrestricted,” he said. “And because we’ve seen this spike, we’ve had to hit pause and extend these orders for another 15 days.”

The state on Monday extended its public health orders until July 15. The orders, which were set to expire Tuesday, are the first to be extended without being loosened in six weeks.

Gordon noted that governors in other states, including Florida and Texas, have closed some businesses again because of spikes there that have begun to fill hospital intensive care units to near capacity. He noted that was a possibility in Wyoming if the situation worsened.

“This is something we don’t want to do,” he said.

As he has in the past, Gordon framed the need to follow public health guidelines in economic terms. If people wear face masks, wash hands and social distance, the state’s economy will continue to recover, he argued.

“I think people thought, ‘No big deal,’” Gordon said. “And you know we can just do what we want to. And I think that carelessness and cavalier attitude has been incredibly unfortunate.

“And so, you know, I come back to saying, if you want the economy to keep going, if you want to make sure that we stay open, if you want to see us move forward to where we were hoping to be, you know, people will mask up,” he said. “People will adhere to these things. People won’t be so cavalier.”

Many people in the state continue to forgo wearing masks in public. Gordon compared such reluctance to “a game of chicken, to a degree.” At indoor businesses in Casper, for example, there are fewer people wearing masks than those going without them.

“And that often doesn’t end well,” he said. “So it’s best to use good judgment. We’re really counting on people to do that.”



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